All Things Australia

Discussion in 'Australia, NZ, Pacific' started by Moi621, Dec 4, 2017.

  1. Grey Matter

    Grey Matter Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, if I recall correctly you live in something like the equivalent of Melbourne's Chinatown. Which reminds me to remind you that if you get a moment I'd still like to see your book recommendations on the Vietnam War given that I found the perspective you presented in a conversation here about a year ago to be of valuable interest to me.

    There aren't many critters here in Houston that could kill me. Brown recluses and black widows are pretty much the only significantly poisonous spiders and in my part of town snakes would be a serious challenge to find. Amusingly we do have city coyotes. How they manage I have no idea, but there've been no reports of them threatening human lives. Cats and small dogs are however at risk on occasion.

    That aggressive funnel web spider y'all have down there is just a nasty little beast. And I reckon y'all must have at least half a dozen incredibly deadly snakes found over all the green growth areas. Then, there's even the ocean critters. Great whites having a surfer's leg for a snack off your south shore there. Those insane blue ringed octopi. Not too mention other beasts like Kangaroos and Cassowaries.

    What exact animals are you talking about in your backyard?
     
  2. bigfella

    bigfella Well-Known Member

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    One of several 'Little Saigons' dotted around Melbourne. Chinatown is right in the middle of the city. I wish I owned property there - sell it & retire. :)

    Crap!, sorry. I''l try to remember. If I forget again remind me.

    One of the killer critters in my yard I mentioned is our version of the Black Widow, the accurately named Redback. I have seen several in my yard and never do any work there without gloves on. We don't have coyotes, but the highest concentrations of foxes in the state live in inner urban areas like mine. Lots of places to live & lots of food, much of it scavenged from rubbish bins etc. We also get the occasional kangaroo, even here in the middle of the city. Plenty of places in the suburbs along the river with roos around, especially when there is a drought.

    Fortunately the funnel webs only happen in one part of Australia. Unfortunately it is the heavily populated coastal strip that runs from south of Sydney to Queensland. The good news is that since we developed antivenom for them in the early 80s no one has died from their bite.

    I think we have something like 5 of the 10 most poisonous snakes in the world here. Some of those live in unpopulated areas or the ocean, and so are minimally dangerous. At least three live around populations - the eastern brown, tiger snake & taipan. I've seen a few browns & tigers, plus some less deadly ones. It pays to be careful.

    Sea life here is no joke. Even here in the cooler climes there are sharks and blue ring octopuses. I have seen blue rings at suburban beaches. I work with a number of recent immigrants & always warn them about those, especially if they have little kids. They aren't aggressive, but one bite and you could die very quickly. Head to Queensland and you have stonefish, deadly cone shells, blue rings, sharks, crocodiles and several species of jellyfish that cause so much pain it kills people.

    Redback spider, bees & European wasps. Bees actually kill more people every year in Australia than any other animal and I am allergic. I also have black spiders, which are not deadly but pack a nasty bite, and huntsman spiders, which aren't dangerous but can be very big and scary looking. I also get orb spiders. They will weave a web across the entire yard & sit in the middle. Not dangerous, but terrifying if you walk into in in the dark & get a spider on your face!

    Magpies (a bird) regularly visit the tree in my backyard. During breeding season they will attack people near their nests, swooping at their heads & sometimes even pecking at their heads & faces. Apparently they can learn to recognize faces. They are responsible for hundres of attacks & injuries every year. A man was killed last year when he was attacked while cycling & fell off his bike.

    I also have several species of possums who regularly visit my tree. They are lovely, peaceful animals, though they do urinate & crap in my yard a lot. I once tried to feed one and it bit my finger. My fault.
     
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  3. Monash

    Monash Well-Known Member

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    Here in Sydney, in our suburb we have the usual possums passing trough (or sometimes in residence if I don't keep the trimming of our taller plants up to date), bandicoots digging up the gardens in search of grubs and worms, bush turkeys and the odd wallaby grazing on lawns at night (they tend not survive that long if they hang around due to traffic) plus the odd snake - usually the big pythons because they are quite happy to settle in urban areas if they can find a quiet den in someones property where they are left alone. Then they go to town on the local possum population. Waling down the street a few months ago I was rewarded with the site of one big 3 meter (plus) specimen devouring (half in/half out) a brush tail possum - the grass verge. Everyone just walked around him and let him be.
     
  4. Moi621

    Moi621 Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Great Place To Put A
    Prison Colony.
    eh

     
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  5. Sallyally

    Sallyally Well-Known Member Donor

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    Yep.
    “Americans have rather romantic ideas about how their country was founded. We’ve long been fond of the mythology surrounding persecuted people freely traveling to the New World and building the greatest country on Earth. But, like all history, it’s much, much messier than that. Our history includes plenty of genocide, slavery, and just a dash of prison folk — and the latter may be news to many Americans who wouldn’t hesitate to make jokes about Australia being populated by the descendants of criminals.”
     
  6. Moi621

    Moi621 Well-Known Member Past Donor

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  7. Sallyally

    Sallyally Well-Known Member Donor

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  8. Moi621

    Moi621 Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Gotta share space with
    the under the bed monster
     
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  9. Monash

    Monash Well-Known Member

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    You have to remember also that the prime reason for sending convicts to Australia in the first place was that after the revolution America stopped taking them! Prior to 1776 they were being shipped off in large numbers to the home of the brave and the land of the free. Makes it kind of hard for an American to make jokes about our 'convict' backgrounds.
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2021 at 10:18 PM
  10. Moi621

    Moi621 Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Wasn't that prison colony limited to Georgia?
     
  11. Monash

    Monash Well-Known Member

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    As far as I understand convicts were transported to most if not all the colonies with no exceptions. Georgia was supposed to be established as a colony using prisoners from debtors prisons but that plan never worked out for some reason. It's a bit of a myth in Georgia and elsewhere. I dont think they got any more/less convicts than any other colony.
     
  12. Moi621

    Moi621 Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Could you be confusing
    Bonded labor
    as opposed to a real prison colony.



    BTW :flagcanada: had legal
    Bonded Labor into the 1920's

    if old memory serves
     
  13. Monash

    Monash Well-Known Member

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    Firstly you had convicts (convicted felons) and secondly convicted debtors (people who couldn't pay their debts and were jailed until they or friends/relatives coughed up). Debtors prisons were a 'thing then but there had to be court proceedings before you you to be sentenced to one - like bankruptcy proceedings but with a prison sentence at the end. As I recall the plan for Georgia was to start a colony using debt prisoners who then, like indentured/bonded workers would work to pay their debts and then be released. I don't believe that plan ever went ahead.

    Then there what you referred to as indentured or bonded workers - who had not been convicted or anything or sentenced to jail. but who owed money or just couldn't pay the cost of passage to America and wanted to immigrate. In those cases someone would pay off their debts (often a ships captain would 'buy' their passage to the US). Either way the payment was in exchange for the right to sell their labor on to an employer in the colonies for a fixed term as specified in a contract. Tough luck if you got a bad employer. The contracts were legally enforceable so if you ran away and were captured you would be returned. Physical punishment could be inflicted for a failure to perform your duties and of course female laborers had to endure sexual assault from their 'employers'. Come to think of it I think the period of indenture could be lengthened a couple of years if a worker had a child while under contract - to cover the additional 'cost ' of the child. Still, unlike slaves once the term of indenture ended you were a free citizen.

    In the early days of the American colonies there were lots of indentured workers. From memory they made up almost half the workforce at one time but convicts were also sent over in large numbers. As far as I am aware they were sent to all the colonies, someone might know of exceptions - I don't.

    Anyway once the colonies decided to get all uppity Australia became the 'go to' dumping ground.
     
    Last edited: Apr 8, 2021 at 9:20 PM
  14. Moi621

    Moi621 Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    And how "they"
    did dump


    Witness India independence
    as opposed to Australia
    refusing to be FREE.

    Whimpering Bi Partisan globalism
    indoctrinated, programmed Australians :eekeyes:



    Support Australia nationalism :woot:
    And mine & your nationalism too




    Moi :oldman:
     
  15. Monash

    Monash Well-Known Member

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    Apples and oranges. Entirely different historical, political, economic and social situations. I suppose Canadians are all indoctrinated and programmed as well.

    Now go away and have a nice lie down, your getting over excited. Just because people disagree with you on a particular subject doesn't mean they're zombified, politically inert robots. It just means they disagree with you. Even if you are the clear sighted, revolutionary 'wunderkind' you seem to think you are.

    And as far as becoming a Republic goes ? Fine, one day we'll have a referendum and we'll either we do it or not. At this stage in Australia's development the change would be almost entirely symbolic, our economic, cultural and political ties having long since parted ways with Queen Victoria's Empire. All we'll end up ding is swapping a hands off Queen for a hands off President. Plus we get a new flag, a new national crest and maybe (but less likely) a Bill of Rights as well. Hooray!
     

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