American Full Breakfast vs English Full Breakfast?

Discussion in 'Food and Wine' started by Daggdag, Nov 3, 2019.

  1. Daggdag

    Daggdag Well-Known Member

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    I am gonna compare the traditional American full breakfast (at least the traditional American full breakfast where I come from) with the traditional English full breakfast....Which one do you think is better?

    American:
    Eggs (fried poached, scrambled, soft boiled, however you like them,......I prefer poached myself)

    Meat (pork sausage, pork bacon, turkey bacon, ham, whichever you like.....You can even go vegan and have tempeh,if you want)

    Potatoes (Fried potatoes, potatoes O'Brien, potatoe cakes, hash, however you like them)

    Pancakes or waffles (with plenty of maple syrup)

    Biscuits or Toast (I get both.....Biscuits & Gravy, and then toast on the side)

    Some type of porridge (oat meal, grits, etc...)''




    English:
    The Full English is sometimes preceded by cold breakfast cereal....though im not sure how traditional this is.

    But the actual full breakast is....
    Eggs

    Bacon

    Black Pudding (This is a blood sausage....meaning it uses actual pork blood as an ingredient. It's mixed wiith oats and pork suet....They are actually very good)

    Baked Beans

    Bubble & Squeak (this is made of boiled potatoes and cabbage (another weird one for Americans that's really good)

    Mushrooms (often sauteed)

    Tomatoes (sometimes simply sliced raw, often grilled or fried)

    Fried bread or toast (fried bread is really just bread that's fried in oil or butter in a skillet....kinda like how grilled cheese is made, but without the cheese)

    I've had a full english a few times, and I typically get everything....I tend to get fried break with the meal itself,and if I want something after I order buttered toast, with jams, honey, etc to spread on it.
     
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  2. Lil Mike

    Lil Mike Well-Known Member

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    When it comes to food, if you put English in front of it, I'm out. America makes tasty meals and the English are...not known for that, as is evident by the lack of English style restaurants world wide.
     
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  3. Daggdag

    Daggdag Well-Known Member

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    Actually the english have come up with several dishes that aredelicious.

    Shepperd's Pie, Steak & Kidney Pie, Beef Wellington just to name a few, but there numerous very delicious foods of English origins
     
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  4. modernpaladin

    modernpaladin Well-Known Member

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    I need to try black pudding and bubble and squeak. Both sound like an excellent addition to breakfast.

    Also breakfast needs grits or fried mush.
     
  5. Curious Always

    Curious Always Well-Known Member Donor

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    The English breakfast sounds okay, but you'd have to get rid of the blood sausage and baked beans. My dad used to make blood sausage. I could smell the nastiness from outside. Blech.

    I do like high tea, though.
     
  6. Moonglow

    Moonglow Well-Known Member

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    How come there is no biscuits and gravy?
     
  7. CKW

    CKW Well-Known Member

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    The black pudding...nah. I'm sure its enjoyed but I'm no interested.

    I've been trying to make Yorkshire pudding....had it once with roast beef and fell in love....but must be a trick or skill because I've been unsuccessful.
     
  8. Daggdag

    Daggdag Well-Known Member

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    Where I come from it's not actually a traditional part of the full breakfast. It's usually buttered biscuits with jam. or buttered toast with jam.

    But as I said in the OP, I usually do have biscuits and gravy, and then I also have buttered toast.
     
  9. Daggdag

    Daggdag Well-Known Member

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    Fun Fact: When someone eats the full traditional English Full Breakfast, it's called having the "Full Monty". This is the origin of the phrase, and it comes from Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, who was a senior British official during WWII. The phrase comes from the fact that he was known for eating a full english breakfast everyday while on compaign.
     
  10. Injeun

    Injeun Well-Known Member

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    They both sound great to me. Though the English sounds a bit healthier with the beans, tomatoes, and cabbage. Okay, now I'm getting hungry.
     
    Last edited: Nov 4, 2019
  11. Blaster3

    Blaster3 Well-Known Member

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    hungryman hero: 3 eggs (over medium), bacon, sausage (brats), ham, homefries (made with onions & bell peppers), cheese (cheddar) all on a hero
     
  12. Daggdag

    Daggdag Well-Known Member

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    Back when I still ate eggs on a regular basic, I prefered over easy, so I could bust the yoke and drip toast into it. There isn't enough uncooked yoke in over-medium eggs IMO.
     
  13. Blaster3

    Blaster3 Well-Known Member

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    true, however in these parts, ordering over easy will get ya a plate full of runny clear snot (raw whites)
     
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  14. Daggdag

    Daggdag Well-Known Member

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    Maybe find a place that actually knows how to cook?
     
  15. Blaster3

    Blaster3 Well-Known Member

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    for the most part, they're all the same, corporate owned chain stores that are more similar to a fastfood joint than a restuarant...

    there are a few independent coffee shops that are good, however they're usually packed & i dont have the patience to wait 30+ minutes to get seated.
    besides, i'm up before 04:30 and majority of places dont open till 08:00, the 24 hour joints will have their 3rd string cook workin, probably hung over & tired, so i just make my own bfast.
     
  16. Montegriffo

    Montegriffo Well-Known Member

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    Failsafe recipe for Yorkshire pudding.

    1 cup plain flour (SR will not work)
    1 cup milk
    1 cup egg
    pinch of salt.

    Slowly beat the eggs and milk into the flour. Do not over mix. Leave to stand for an hour or more.
    Preheat oven to about 200C.
    Put 1/4'' oil in the bottom of baking tray and heat until smoking.
    Pour batter in trays and cook until risen. Pudding will come out of tray without sticking once it is fully cooked.

    The 2 common errors with Yorkshire pudding are not enough egg and not pre-heating trays.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Collateral Damage

    Collateral Damage Well-Known Member

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    The 'Full Monty' has gotten a different definition since the movie came out. I'd be careful of the company when you use that phrase...

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0119164/
     
  18. Montegriffo

    Montegriffo Well-Known Member

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    Disputed origin of the Full Monty.
    Some say it was Montgomery's practice of being fully prepared and having all his men well-fed and equipment in place before any offensive began.
    The more likely origin was a shortening of Montague Burton the tailors who provided a 3 piece suit, a Full Monty.
     
  19. Collateral Damage

    Collateral Damage Well-Known Member

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    I've encountered the runny snot things many times, so I use the term light over medium, cook the whites, save the yolks. Sometimes it actually works and I get eggs that I enjoy. My bacon, however, must be so done it's shy of being ashes. No flippity floppin' bacon for me, no thanks!
     
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  20. Badaboom

    Badaboom Well-Known Member

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    I prefer my bacon to be on the soft side. Cooked but not crispy and thick sliced. I also take two slices of ham and two pork sausage. My eggs are sunny side-up with the yoke still runny which I dip my well buttered toast in. Baked beans is a must and some fresh fruits.

    But my favorite winter breakfast is, five Buckwheat pancakes with butter and molasses and a nice cup of tea with milk and sugar.
     
  21. CKW

    CKW Well-Known Member

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    Just double checking...one CUP eggs?
     
  22. Montegriffo

    Montegriffo Well-Known Member

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    Yes, you want equal quantities of all the ingredients. You will get away with slightly less egg but too little and it won't rise.
     
  23. CKW

    CKW Well-Known Member

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    Thank you! I will give it a shot and let you know
     
  24. Montegriffo

    Montegriffo Well-Known Member

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    So long as your oven is hot you will not fail. 200C gas mark 7.
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2019 at 1:14 PM
  25. Blaster3

    Blaster3 Well-Known Member

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    that'd be 392F... us ovens are marked in increments of 25 degrees, so 400F will have to do
     

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