Are you concerned about lead poisoning?

Discussion in 'Gun Control' started by Galileo, Dec 6, 2019.

  1. Galileo

    Galileo Well-Known Member

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    " 'There is no question that the toxic levels of lead at shooting ranges are endangering America’s children and families,' VPC Senior Policy Analyst and report author Tom Diaz said today. 'No amount of lead exposure is known to be completely safe for a child. Poisonous Pastime reveals for the first time that the gun industry—through toxic and unregulated ranges—is sacrificing the health of our children for profit.'

    " Poisonous Pastime details how outdoor firing ranges put more lead into the environment than nearly any other major industrial sector in the U.S., yet they remain almost entirely unregulated. In just two years a typical outdoor firing range can have lead contamination equivalent to a five-acre Superfund site."
    http://vpc.org/press/press-release-...ildren-one-of-the-nations-top-lead-polluters/

    You should be concerned.
     
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  2. Diablo

    Diablo Well-Known Member

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    We've taken the lead out of petrol and paint, but not from firing ranges?
     
  3. Xenamnes

    Xenamnes Well-Known Member

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    Is ammunition meant to be ingested?
     
  4. Dispondent

    Dispondent Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    If the target dies of lead poisoning, you're totally doing it wrong...
     
  5. Galileo

    Galileo Well-Known Member

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    No, but lead can be unintentionally inhaled.

    "Exposure to lead poisoning in indoor firing ranges comes primarily from inhaling lead particles suspended in the air in the range (although it may also be ingested orally, with contaminated food for example). These particles come principally from ignition of the primer, which contains lead styphnate, from microscopic lead particles scraped off the bullet as it passes through the gun barrel, and from lead dust created when the bullet strikes the target or the backstop behind the target."
    http://vpc.org/publications/poisono...d-environmental-pollution-and-health-hazards/
     
  6. Galileo

    Galileo Well-Known Member

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    Lead poisoning has been linked to criminal behavior.

    "Lead poisoning has long been known to cause terribly debilitating and sometimes fatal effects on one’s body. But there is a growing body of evidence that the neurological damage that lead causes also helps cause violent criminal behavior, perhaps even 'rampage' killings.5 Ironically, overexposure to lead at shooting ranges may therefore cause some violent gun crime."
    http://vpc.org/publications/poisono...d-environmental-pollution-and-health-hazards/
     
  7. vman12

    vman12 Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Well...maybe.
     
  8. vman12

    vman12 Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Maybe they could pass a law or someth...

    Oh. They already did. Nevermind.

    https://www.osha.gov/Publications/OSHA3772.pdf
     
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  9. Doofenshmirtz

    Doofenshmirtz Well-Known Member Donor

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    Thats almost as dangerous as giving our kids toys made in China!
     
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  10. Xenamnes

    Xenamnes Well-Known Member

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    Does lead poisoning cause violent behavior? Or are those who already experience violent behavior simply more prone to lead poisoning?
     
  11. Robert E Allen

    Robert E Allen Well-Known Member

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    Any exuse to get rid of my rights...

    Got it..

    I yhink there ot too much liberal noise pollution. There are no safe levels of it.

    I think it should be illegal for liberals to talk.
     
  12. Robert E Allen

    Robert E Allen Well-Known Member

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    Ohh and as a fisherman I've been pinching lead weights with my teeth since i was 10..
     
  13. Turtledude

    Turtledude Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    i have been on indoor ranges well over 1000 hours and have a minor increase above average of lead. Lead in outdoor ranges is contained in backstops and at my shooting range, they reclaim the lead from the trap and skeet fields every few years, yielding our club 50,000 dollars as a result.

    The Vile Propaganda Center constantly lies about gun use
     
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  14. Galileo

    Galileo Well-Known Member

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    The VPC is correct:

    "Thirty-six articles were reviewed that included BLLs [blood lead levels] from shooters at firing ranges. In 31 studies BLLs > 10 μg/dL [micrograms per deciliter] were reported in some shooters, 18 studies reported BLLs > 20 μg/dL, 17 studies > 30 μg/d, and 15 studies BLLs > 40 μg/dL. The literature indicates that BLLs in shooters are associated with Pb aerosol discharge from guns and air Pb at firing ranges, number of bullets discharged, and the caliber of weapon fired....

    "Nearly all BLL measurements compiled in the reviewed studies exceed the current reference level of 5 μg/dL recommended by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (CDC/NIOSH). Thus firing ranges, regardless of type and user classification, currently constitute a significant and unmanaged public health problem. Prevention includes clothing changed after shooting, behavioural modifications such as banning of smoking and eating at firing ranges, improved ventilation systems and oversight of indoor ranges, and development of airflow systems at outdoor ranges. Eliminating lead dust risk at firing ranges requires primary prevention and using lead-free primers and lead-free bullets."
    https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12940-017-0246-0
     
  15. Tim15856

    Tim15856 Well-Known Member

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  16. modernpaladin

    modernpaladin Well-Known Member Donor

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    A very good point. We should decriminalize solid brass and copper ammunition so ranges can mandate 'no lead.' I have yet to ever see any kids rolling around in the dirt at any of our local shooting spots, but it would certainly be worrying if they were.
     
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  17. Xenamnes

    Xenamnes Well-Known Member

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    Such is a natural side-effect and/or consequence of the united states federal government not allowing the use of alternative metal component for projectile construction, due to deeming said configuring armor-piercing in nature. If all steel and brass projectiles were legal for handgun use, lead poisoning would not be a problem. But because such is prohibited by law, there is no viable alternative to lead usage. Therefore the public has no choice but to be poisoned in pursuit of their constitutional rights.
     
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  18. Galileo

    Galileo Well-Known Member

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    How about rubber bullets? Aren't they legal?
     
  19. modernpaladin

    modernpaladin Well-Known Member Donor

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    They are. And they're a decent option for close range pistol practice. They lack suitable mass to keep accuracy at distance.
     
  20. Badaboom

    Badaboom Well-Known Member Donor

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    No, I'm not worried about lead or any other industrial poisoning.
    I couldn't be more happy for my third arm that grew out of my back and my second sexual organ...
     
  21. Xenamnes

    Xenamnes Well-Known Member

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    Such projectiles are indeed legal, but entirely useless for applications where deadly force is justified and necessary. They are equally unsuitable for firearms that utilized a rifled bore, meaning any firearm that is not a shotgun.
     
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  22. modernpaladin

    modernpaladin Well-Known Member Donor

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    A good point. If rubber bullets became a range requirement, smoothbore firearms would become more popular. Those firearms that then innevitably found their way to the violent criminal elements would make bullet forensics nearly impossible, as the rifling is the primary characteristic used to match bullet to firearm.

    Not a good idea.
     
  23. Xenamnes

    Xenamnes Well-Known Member

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    That is to say nothing of the health issues that would eventually arise from the use of rubber projectiles, as there would be no buffer between the rubber and the heat of the burning powder driving it. Instead of breathing in lead particles, individuals would be breathing in burning rubber fumes.
     
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  24. Badaboom

    Badaboom Well-Known Member Donor

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    Isn't there a bit of fiber between the rubber and the powder? At least the rubber buckshots have it.

    [​IMG]
     
  25. perdidochas

    perdidochas Well-Known Member

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    18 year old study. Find something more recent.
     
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