declining standard of living in Australia

Discussion in 'Australia, NZ, Pacific' started by kazenatsu, Jul 10, 2017.

  1. Sallyally

    Sallyally Well-Known Member

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    He's a very interesting bloke and explained the ideas behind austerity very well.
     
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  2. garry17

    garry17 Active Member

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    Seriously, I have to ask are you attempting to have real discussion of the impact of immigration on the economy???

    I ask because I cannot work out if you’re trying to have a shot at the government or the migrants. Putting it in perspective the premise that Australia's standards of living is going down is flat out false. Labor wants to play politics of envy but the facts are fabricated.



    First do you want to suggest that basic standard of living is decreasing??? In Australia without lifting a finger other than to fill out a few forms you can put a roof over your head. Without lifting a finger you can fill you cupboards with food again not many nations in the world provide this same. Without lifting a finger you can purchase a mode of transport or in some cases more than one mode of transport and fill it to travel just about anywhere in this nation. Without lifting a finger you can travel to other nations on holidays. In very few nations on this planet you can do the same.

    In Australia today you can do ALL these things now… In the past you would have had to make a choice. So considering that, perhaps you could point out exactly where the basic standard of living has taken a downward turn

    OR are you inferring the average standard of living is dropping???


    Australia has the highest home ownership that it has ever had and the highest new car ownership it has ever had. The ratio of wage to house prices are at their lowest over all ever and frankly the total spend on recreational equipment has never been higher.


    I will not believe you consider a reduction in the highest standard of living as some indicator of the premise as from other posts indicate the envy of that end of the market.

    OK, so when you can indicate that standards of living has decreased in say the last decade compared to the decade before the premise of your debate is flawed.

    BY THE WAY, immigration actually helps the standard of living increase, not decrease. YOUR standard of living is based upon your buying power NOT your wealth.

    So can I assume you are actually trying to equate the growing gap of the rich and poor to the immigration debate??? If this is the case you have to understand that poor in Australia is actually relative and subjective. Immigrants who come to Australia are automatically considered poor if they need to rely on welfare for one week. Ergo the asylum seekers bolster the poor figures by around 2% a year. While those want to argue that point, I will point out that this increase is convoluted by governments and oppositions to support cases for and against policies (and not just migration)

    I could go on, but unless we have clarification the entire debate is false. For those who want to debate the politics of envy the lie will grow as it has shown in thread already.
     
  3. crank

    crank Well-Known Member

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    Public schools are about $200 a year in Australia.
    You're spending way more than you need to on groceries!
    Clothing is only 'expensive' if you're so spoilt that you can't wear op shop stuff, and/or refuse to shop at kmart :p

    Yes, we are our own worst enemies.

    Meantime, those who complain about rents/housing, are almost always those who demand to live in the most expensive inner city areas. You never hear those complaints from people in regional or outer suburban areas. Again, self-inflicted spoilt-brattery.
     
  4. Sallyally

    Sallyally Well-Known Member

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    The costs of outer suburban living are often offset by commuting costs in time and money. It can be a toss up when deciding where to live.
    I'm not sure about school costs now, but government schools cost me nearly that much twenty years ago when my kids were in secondary school.
    I don't mind op shop clothes, but we got used to having new clothes and not second hand or hand me downs.
    Kmart is no longer cheap fair quality clothing. It is cheap rubbish which does not last long.
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2017 at 8:23 AM
  5. crank

    crank Well-Known Member

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    Example, even if a weekly train ticket is $100 from the outskirts to the CBD, the rent can be less than half .. so there is no comparison. I know someone paying $660pw for a studio apartment in city fringe, while a similar property (actually better, as it's bigger, and includes a car space) an hour out, rents for $320pw. You're still well ahead even factoring in the $100 for train. If you move to a regional city with good infrastructure (Bendigo, Goulburn, etc), you're miles ahead. There are fewer candidates for jobs, small business opportunities, virtually no commuting costs, and cheap rent/house prices. Of course, your Bendigos and your Goulburns are becoming expensive by comparison to other smaller cities, because so many city folk have realised all the above. They're buying up the good stock of beautiful old houses, and getting some of that good affordable life.

    Public high schools run at about $200 in actual fees .. plus excursions and sports etc. Wouldn't get anywhere near $1000, much less $4000.

    Km@rt is indeed, rubbish. Op Shop clothing is a better option.
     
  6. m2catter

    m2catter Well-Known Member

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    When I told that my daughter she first couldn't believe what I was saying, then burst into laughter. She told me "yes dad, that was when I was a child, but things have changed since".
    It looks like my grandchildren aren't as cheap to get through public schools as it used to when my daughter went through the system.
    Regards
     
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  7. crank

    crank Well-Known Member

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    That's the 2017 fee. Actually it's more like $180-something. Add in excursions/sports, voluntary contributions etc, and it amounts to around $500 a year.
     
  8. scarlet witch

    scarlet witch Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Exactly, $200 is ridiculous, my son is in public Secondary, it was $4000 (including laptop of $1500 & uniform A$500) to get him into his first year, I received the paperwork for year 8 this week, here's the list, not including another pair of A$70 school shoes I bought him a week ago because he's growing so fast, uniform I bought last year won't last much longer

    A$724 school fees
    A$285 camp
    A$369 for books
     

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