Should anyone food service or restaurants with tattoos be required to pass Hepatitis tests?

Discussion in 'Opinion POLLS' started by Pollycy, Jul 8, 2018.

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Should those working food service or restaurants with tattoos be required to pass hepatitis tests?

This poll will close on Jul 29, 2018 at 5:48 PM.
  1. To keep Hep-C from spreading, these employees should all have to pass hepatitis tests first.

    10 vote(s)
    66.7%
  2. No, having a tattoo does not mean you should have to pass hepatitis tests.

    5 vote(s)
    33.3%
  1. Max Rockatansky

    Max Rockatansky Well-Known Member

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  2. Bowerbird

    Bowerbird Well-Known Member

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    Yes and which Hepatitis is only transmitted through blood to blood contact? This is off topic simply because you, like everyone else on this thread did not bother to google the specific disease
     
  3. HonestJoe

    HonestJoe Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Admit your dislike of people with tattoos, if only to yourself and consider how it might be unduly influencing your opinion on this specific issue?

    Measurable yes but the significance is in question. It’s questioned by experts in the very article you linked. There are other factors that would increase the risk too, some significantly more yet you’re not proposing mandatory tests for any of them.

    There is also the fact that give the total incidence of Hepatitis C is a small fraction of 1% of the population and the increased risk due to tattoos will add a fraction of that again. If you can justify testing on the basis of the relatively tiny increase, why can’t you justify testing on the basis of the entire risk?

    I think you’re grossly overselling the risk and “stupidity”. I’m not a huge fan of tattoos in general but as long as you use a reputable artist who follows all the standard safety and infection control measures, I see no reason for it to be especially risky.

    I’m not sure you understand the vector of disease transmission here. It’s has nothing to do with the ink being injected, it’s about previous customers blood remaining on multi-use and insufficiently cleaned equipment. It’s important to be clear if you’re going to assess the true scale of risk.
     
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  4. Max Rockatansky

    Max Rockatansky Well-Known Member

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    Ahh, so me mentioning Hep B is off topic but it's okay for you to mention Hep A? Fascinating. Is that the typical Aussie sense of fairness or just the Far Left sense?

    Earlier I mentioned testing of all food service and health employees for communicable diseases. For some reason you are against this. Why?
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018 at 8:09 AM
  5. Pollycy

    Pollycy Well-Known Member

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    If you feel like taking a chance with something as lethal as hepatitis, then that's your choice. Me? If tat-wearers have a greater risk of having and spreading hepatitis than the rest of the population, I think they should be tested before they are allowed to work in a restaurant or in a grocery store handling unpackaged food. But, hey, it wasn't so very long ago in history that people didn't believe in the existence of germs at all!

    upload_2018-7-11_7-58-4.jpeg
     
  6. Collateral Damage

    Collateral Damage Well-Known Member

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    There are so many things wrong with this post I'm not sure where to begin.

    Foodservice employees are not 'underpaid', they are paid commensurate with their experience.
    McDonalds restaurants are franchisee owned, which is separate from McDonalds corporate, as is most franchised restaurants. Most quick serve restaurants run a profit margin of below 10%.
    Just as it is the employee candidates responsibility to prove (by identification) that they are legally eligible to work in the United States, if such a test were to be required by law, it is not necessarily the employer's responsibility to pay for it. Do you ask a prospective sexual partner to pay for your STD test?) If a person will be driving on behalf of a company, the employer doesn't usually pay for the MVR report. There are certain things that you can 'take with you', ie would benefit you with any employer in the same field. If the employer pays for it, then they own the results, and if you change employers, you would have to go through it all over again. If the employee pays for it, they can use the results as part of their selling points to a new employer.

    A number of restaurants require the use of gloves in food handling, to reduce the possibility of contamination from a number of diseases or cross contamination. Personally, I don't care if someone has a tattoo or not, but I do feel more comfortable when they wear gloves as it covers a larger range of possibilities.
     
  7. Max Rockatansky

    Max Rockatansky Well-Known Member

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    I think what the Aussie is trying to say is that catching Hep C from a food service worker would be rare. More likely to catch Hep A or B from them. IMO, all food service and health workers should be regularly tested for communicable diseases.

    FWIW, Hep C can be cured: https://www.webmd.com/hepatitis/features/hep-c-cure#1

    Hep A and Hep B not so much, but there are vaccines. I've had mine due to my line of work. They're a series of shots. I think it's mandatory for some lines of work like health care workers.

    https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hav/afaq.htm
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018 at 12:09 PM
  8. Bowerbird

    Bowerbird Well-Known Member

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    I mentioned Hep A because it was obvious you and others were getting the modes of transmission confused
     
  9. Bowerbird

    Bowerbird Well-Known Member

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    What part of blood borne transmission are you not understanding
     
  10. Max Rockatansky

    Max Rockatansky Well-Known Member

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    Feel free to quote a single post where I got "the modes of transmission confused". If you can't or won't do it, will you either man up and apologize or retract your false accusation?

    IF, OTOH, can produce a statement where I got "the modes of transmission confused", I'll happily apologize and thank you for your correction. Fair enough?
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018 at 12:50 PM
  11. Dispondent

    Dispondent Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Is the spread of Hep C really that much of a concern to justify the costs the testing would require?
     
  12. Pollycy

    Pollycy Well-Known Member

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    The relatively new wonder drug, Harvoni, can cure people of Hep C over 90% of the time. The cost is $80,000 - $100,000 if the infected person has no health insurance. With excellent health insurance, the cost will drop dramatically to probably to less than $5,000. How many 'tat-people' have "excellent health insurance"...?

    Remember that you must factor in all the doctor's office visits, the liver biopsy operation and test, and even after all the Harvoni prescriptions (usually three) are paid for and taken, there is the continuing requirement for ultra-sound examinations of the liver for a couple of years afterward.

    How much does a simple hepatitis test cost?
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2018 at 2:05 PM
  13. Dispondent

    Dispondent Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I think you might be missing my point. The food industry is huge, when you factor in large and small businesses and start looking at costs you'll see that unless the threat of a Hep C outbreak is rather high, the costs of testing over time would be higher than the insurance payout to administer the cure in the event that someone did spread the disease...
     
  14. Pollycy

    Pollycy Well-Known Member

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    You are absolutely correct about the vaccines for hepatitis A and B, Max. Unfortunately, there is, as yet, no vaccine for Hep-C. Everybody, and I do mean EVERYBODY should be vaccinated against hepatitis A and B, and frankly, even though I hate the idea of most forms of 'socialized medicine', I'd be in favor of having the government pay for vaccinations for poor people. Anything is better than having many thousands of people, with and without tattoos, running amok in society spreading hepatitis, even though they don't even realize that they are doing this.
     
  15. Max Rockatansky

    Max Rockatansky Well-Known Member

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    Agreed there's no vaccine for Hep C, but, as the link noted, there's a cure. Also agreed that everyone should be vaccinated for public health hazards and the cost subsidized with tax dollars since it is in keeping with the "promote the general Welfare". A clause, unfortunately, often abused by Democrats.
     
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  16. Day of the Candor

    Day of the Candor Well-Known Member

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    Hep A, B, and C can be spread in different ways and it is true that each kind of hepatitis will destroy your liver and kill you. Here is a link from the CDC. https://www.cdc.gov/hepatitis/hbv/bfaq.htm . There are enough things in life that will kill you if given a chance, so why push your luck by having your food handled by people with tats? They should be tested and passed before they are allowed to work with food.
     
  17. Bowerbird

    Bowerbird Well-Known Member

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    Sorry but do you know the definition of an STD(sexually transmitted disease)?

    It is a disease that is so hard to catch that it takes intimate contact involving mucous membranes and body fluids to transmit it person to person. Blood borne diseases are even harder to catch

    Unless you piss your wait staff off enough for them to gob in your food it is unlikely that you would catch anything
     
  18. Pollycy

    Pollycy Well-Known Member

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    I, for one, would not want to entrust the safety of my life to whether or not "wait staff" are pissed-off about something or not.... We have become an angry, somewhat deranged society during the 21st-century, and I trust fewer and fewer people all the time.

    Ya know, more and more often, I just eat at home, and I don't worry about getting diseases there.
     

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