Super fast Turtle

Discussion in 'Animal Welfare' started by Robert, Jul 14, 2018.

  1. Robert

    Robert Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Just when you believe in the turtle and hare story, you see this happening. No, it is not my story, your own eyes will persuade you that turtles might seem slow, but do not simply think that. I believe I am correct that this is a snapping turtle which is dangerous to humans.

     
  2. Robert

    Robert Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    This is not a snapping turtle. Notice it has a slender snout. I should know the name but am not that much learned on various turtle types. If you know this type, say so.

     
  3. Robert

    Robert Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Another with the snout. Check this speed demon out.

     
  4. Robert

    Robert Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    A bit of music to make this more fun. And he runs on a treadmill.

     
  5. Robert

    Robert Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I am now thinking it is the turtle with the snout that is so blazing fast. Help me please

     
  6. Robert

    Robert Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    OK, found in Florida and SE states. And reputation of very fast.
    The Florida softshell turtle typically has a dark brown to olive green, leathery carapace with a white or cream-colored underside,[4] which visually conceals young turtles from potential predators.[5] It has a long neck and an elongated head with a long snorkel-like nose. It is the largest softshell turtle in North America and one of the largest freshwater turtles there, as well (only the alligator snapping turtle averages considerably larger), reaching about 15 to 76 cm (5.9 to 29.9 in) in length.[4] The female is larger, with the average male reaching only about 35 cm (14 in). The female can weigh up to 20 kg (44 lb), with the record weight documented at 43.6 kg (96 lb).[1][6] Nesting adult females were found to average 6.65 kg (14.7 lb) in weight, and measure 40.1 cm (15.8 in) in carapace length and 30.1 cm (11.9 in) in plastron length.[7] In comparison, 127 males were found to average 2.68 kg (5.9 lb) in weight and measure 22.75 cm (8.96 in) in plastron length.[6] In comparison, the juvenile is olive-yellow with grey spots and yellow lines. Also, yellow and orange markings are found on the head and the plastron is gray. The markings disappear or fade as it ages.[4]

    Behavior[edit]
    A. ferox is almost entirely aquatic, only emerging from the water to bask or to lay eggs.[4] It prefers the still waters of ponds, streams, lakes, and swamps. Like all softshells, it is very fast-moving in water and on land.[4] This species is carnivorous, consuming fish, insects, crustaceans, and mollusks. It may also scavenge.[1
     

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