Unstable countries like South Sudan.

Discussion in 'Other Regions' started by Brett Nortje, May 27, 2017.

  1. Brett Nortje

    Brett Nortje Well-Known Member

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    South sudan has been in trouble for a long time now, with two sides to the military. i think they have tried to roll the military into one body, but this has failed hopelessly. the problem is blind servitude to certain generals, and, war incitement by senior soldiers, where when there is a opportunity to fight, they put petrol on the fire to incite violence, to keep the soldiers together and in high spirits, still fighting for what they originally fought for - their leaders to have power.

    So, if this is the only way to end it, i would hazard a ante that 'they allow these generals power.' if it comes to saving lives and stabilizing the economy, so that people will have a better way of life, then why not appoint the generals into senior positions? why not, better yet, allow the generals to be senators from their own regions? like provinces or states - they could run those, yes?

    But, these are old solutions to problems, we need new ones. the soldiers were promised riches, something they still long for - give them houses? they still long for authority - mould them into a political party? these things should buy them over, at little cost, then the promises would be kept, they will need to lower their arms... i mean, loyalty is one thing, providing for your family is another.
     
  2. Brett Nortje

    Brett Nortje Well-Known Member

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    I have been watching an interview of one of the well versed leaders in nigeria, leader of a huge company i think, and he proposed a new term to me that i never realized was real - no man's land. this term makes me think we have been doing it all wrong so far, as, with an area like this, it is obviously where people go to join terrorist cells, sell humans in human trafficking and other wise deal drugs and so forth. this area is in north africa, of course, i think close to the horn of africa, but, there must be other areas like this in africa, and, of course, the world. with this being rife even in cities, like places police would be shot if they went there, the political landscape and such looks to have no effect on it, while it has an effect on the political landscape, of course. what happens there i have no clue, but after seeing the conditions people live in, i would suppose that many people occupy it and there is no rule of law there, of course.

    So why should states be worried about this other than 'to push it away?' well, they could get lots of voters on their side if hey provided a good standard of living for them, but, honestly, many of them are addicted to drugs and will only vote for opposition leaders. now, i am suggesting that the opposition will not even go in there, even though they are supported there, as they will be taken hostage by people or exploited in some way, so, there must be a resolution, of course.

    The simple solution is to fence up the area, with a regional or city 'border.' this will stop people from going out or in along the road, and, then they may search them extensively before they leave the country, of course. asking for passports and such would sort it out quickly, and, no doubt will land them the ire of the terrorists, yes? this means they need to stop food going into these areas - proclaiming them ghost towns, shutting down the water and saying that this is like supporting terror might suffice, as, if they live there and do not report them, they are a par of it - this is the same as knowing about a crime and not reporting it, of course.
     
  3. waltky

    waltky Well-Known Member

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    Granny says, "Oh, dem po' chill'uns - whatever will dey do?...
    [​IMG]
    Among South Sudan's refugees, thousands of stranded children
    Jun 16,`17 -- Bakita Juma doesn't like to think about her dead parents because it makes her cry. The slender teenager would rather focus on the woman whom aid officials recently chose to raise her and her siblings on a small piece of earth in what has become the world's largest refugee settlement.
    See also:

    UN says aid to 9 million Syrian children is in peril
    Jun 16,`17 -- The U.N. children's agency is warning that a critical funding shortfall is threatening aid to 9 million Syrian children, both in their country and among the refugees in neighboring states.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2017
  4. Brett Nortje

    Brett Nortje Well-Known Member

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    To stabilize these regions, or, more importantly, to accommodate the refugees, there should be some market created for assets and skills. all of these refugees have money in the bank, and, houses to live in, in some or other state 'financially.'

    So, the best course of action would be for them to get a positive identity booklet from the nearby police and banks, and, put their past assets to use. they will be able to get money out of their banks into the new regions banks, and, build small houses for themselves while others will buy houses - maybe with a loan? - where they can pay it off for a while. then, they can contact their past universities to wire a copy of the degrees or certificates they have collected, as well as pay slips evidence of employment in their past residences, of course.

    With a little effort, these people will turn from a nuisance into human capital. the people that are homeless and so forth would have stayed as then they would have had a house and food for a while, which they would not have passed up, so they are probably not amongst the refugees, and, there is not that much poverty in these near eastern zones.
     
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  5. waltky

    waltky Well-Known Member

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    Rape, Domestic Abuse Among Traumas Refugees Carry to Refugee Camps...
    [​IMG]
    Rape, Domestic Abuse Among Traumas South Sudan Refugees Carry to Camps
    June 20, 2017 — The nearly 1 million South Sudanese refugees in Uganda face shortages of food, water and medical care, but they have also brought with them the trauma of the war they fled. Aid agencies are struggling to meet the need for counseling for survivors of gender-based violence.
    See also:

    Global Forcible Displacement at Unprecedented High
    June 19, 2017 — A new report has found that more people than ever before have become refugees or are internally displaced worldwide because of war, violence, and persecution.
     
  6. waltky

    waltky Well-Known Member

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    Cholera outbreak in Sudan...
    [​IMG]
    Sudanese Doctors Urge Measures Against Cholera Outbreak
    July 02, 2017 - Sudanese doctors and aid workers are urging the government to declare a state of emergency over a cholera outbreak and delay the start of the school year, which began Sunday.
     
  7. waltky

    waltky Well-Known Member

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    South Sudan's government using food as weapon of war...
    [​IMG]
    Exclusive: South Sudan's government using food as weapon of war - U.N. report
    November 10, 2017 - South Sudan President Salva Kiir’s government is using food as a weapon of war to target civilians by blocking life-saving aid in some areas, United Nations sanctions monitors told the Security Council in a confidential report seen by Reuters on Friday.
     

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