What books are you reading?

Discussion in 'Music, TV, Movies & other Media' started by Guno, Jan 6, 2018.

  1. Guno

    Guno Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    fiction

    non fiction

    history

    other
     
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  2. Nonnie

    Nonnie Well-Known Member Past Donor

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  3. Nonnie

    Nonnie Well-Known Member Past Donor

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  4. JakeStarkey

    JakeStarkey Well-Known Member

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    volume 5 of the Longmire series

    as good as the TV
     
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  5. Guno

    Guno Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    A book by a personal friend

    The Wrong Side of Murder Creek: A White Southerner in the Freedom Movement
    Bob Zellner

    The journey white Southerners travel in this riveting memoir, from virulent racism to acceptance of blacks' civil rights, is as momentous as any in American history. Zellner moved a shorter distance—son of a progressive, integrationist minister from Alabama, he had his family's support when he joined the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in 1961. A frontline participant in many civil rights battles, he was jailed, beaten, slashed, shot at by police and taken on a terrifying night ride by Klansmen as they debated whether to lynch him. He's also a canny observer of major figures in the struggle, from SNCC legend Robert Moses to segregationist stalwart George Wallace. Zellner comes off as confident, even cocky—especially in his many arguments with racist antagonists, of which he has an implausible verbatim recall—but the constant menace of howling white mobs, vicious cops and Klan terrorists takes its toll. The result is a testament both to the courage of civil rights activists and to the hatred they overcame; when Zellner survives to see white and black workers come together for a wildcat strike, it seems almost miraculous.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2018
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  6. Mr_Truth

    Mr_Truth Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]




    Elizabeth, Mary, and Sophia Peabody were in many ways our American Brontes. The story of these remarkable sisters — and their central role in shaping the thinking of their day — has never before been fully told. Twenty years in the making, Megan Marshall's monumental biograpy brings the era of creative ferment known as American Romanticism to new life. Elizabeth, the oldest sister, was a mind-on-fire thinker. A powerful influence on the great writers of the era — Emerson, Hawthorne, and Thoreau among them — she also published some of their earliest works. It was Elizabeth who prodded these newly minted Transcendentalists away from Emerson's individualism and toward a greater connection to others. Mary was a determined and passionate reformer who finally found her soul mate in the great educator Horace Mann. The frail Sophia was a painter who won the admiration of the preeminent society artists of the day. She married Nathaniel Hawthorne — but not before Hawthorne threw the delicate dynamics among the sisters into disarray. Marshall focuses on the moment when the Peabody sisters made their indelible mark on history. Her unprecedented research into these lives uncovered thousands of letters never read before as well as other previously unmined original sources. The Peabody Sisters casts new light on a legendary American era. Its publication is destined to become an event in American biography. This book is highly recommended for students and reading groups interested in American history, American literature, and women's studies. It is a wonderful look into 19th-century life.



    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/341894.The_Peabody_Sisters





    The correct Yankee pronunciation is PEA boh dee, not pea BOD dee.




    The Transcendentalists* exerted greater influence over American society than any other group except for our Founding Fathers. Interestingly, women (many of whom were self educated) were highly influential in this progressive movement - Mahatma Ghandi, Dr Martin Luther King, and the 1960s anti-war movement were among their disciples. The Peabody sisters were among the most influential and this well researched tome gives many great details about their successes.








    * http://www.transcendentalists.com/
     
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  7. scarlet witch

    scarlet witch Well-Known Member Past Donor

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