acting like Batman character "The Joker" stabs 17, starts fire on a train in Japan

Discussion in 'Asia' started by kazenatsu, Nov 2, 2021.

  1. kazenatsu

    kazenatsu Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    A young man dressed as the famous Batman villain the Joker went on a Halloween rampage that injured at least 17 people including 3 serious cases on board a Tokyo train bound for Shinjuku. He then started a fire in one of the train’s wagons on Sunday.
    The suspect was identified as Kyota Hattori, 24, who was arrested and investigated for attempted murder. Before he was taken into custody, Hattori was seen sitting and casually smoking after stabbing and spraying hydrochloric acid on passengers. He told the police that he regrets not killing anyone in the attack.​

    https://www.thegatewaypundit.com/20...-tokyo-train-started-fire-trains-wagon-video/

    The Asian brain is very predisposed to be good at copying things. It was probably not a good idea to let him watch that movie.


    The first thing many of you have to understand is that there were probably some unique cultural factors that led to this crime. (That is very often the case with any big crime committed by a Japanese person in Japan)
    Big city Japan does not really have a moral compass; everything works through collectivism and social pressure, people feeling like they are part of the collective. Also shame. Japanese can be severely shamed by all sorts of small things. (Men have disappeared from their wives simply because they were unable to earn enough money. They are too ashamed to return to the house or even tell their wife why they have disappeared.) There are all sorts of social phenomena that only happen in Japan.
    Then there is the phenomena of Shinjuku. Young adults there commonly put on an imaginary persona and dress up the part, walking the street in their everyday lives in elaborate costumes, often of some fictional animated character. There are all sorts of different subcultures with this. Some of them can get very caught up in their imaginary persona. That appears to be partly what happened here.

    The Japanese brain especially can get very mentally focused on things. Most of the time this leads to admirable qualities, but in rare cases this might not always be a good thing.
    Did I mention many Japanese younger people do not live in the real world and derive all their happiness from some imaginary fantasy world? Not healthy.


    A similar incident to this one happened in America in Colorado in 2012, when a 24 year old dressed as the Joker killed 12 people in a movie theater full of people who were watching the latest Batman film screening. Both that Batman film and the preceding one had very psychologically dark stories involving psychopathic main villains, terrorism and large scale mass murder.
     

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