Ancient DNA and the human past

Discussion in 'History & Past Politicians' started by ThirdTerm, May 1, 2017.

  1. Moi621

    Moi621 Well-Known Member Donor

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    Can you be specific.
    Give examples of what you say in general above?

    Thank you
    Hey, it ain't like I'm asking for a reference. Just more of what are you thinking, specifically.
     
  2. Strasser

    Strasser Banned

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    I'll find some statistics for you, have to look them up, but basically a Caucasian having children with an Asian woman is not mutating genes, it's recombination. Mutations are actual completely new changes in the genes themselves, via abnormal means.
     
  3. Moi621

    Moi621 Well-Known Member Donor

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    No need to look it up. Really.

    What I was saying :blahblah: was to the best of my knowledge there are 3 genome, biochemical pathways that whitened darker skin. The Asian way. The Finn and the Yamnaya.
    BTW I do not buy the Out of Africa stuff. Rather continuity through continuous hybridization.

    Then the question is how did Whiter a recessive trait become dominant in populations.
    Answer: Sexual selection. All cultures value a paler complexion. Koreans, Japanese, Chinese, India, South East Asia, etc. etc. Even Black men. ;)

    Maybe Vitamin D synthesis in skin too. Before American milk was Vitamin D fortified, rickets was relatively common in the new Black population that settled the North after the War Between the States. In more primitive times, darker persons may have had more health issues at northern latitudes. Vitamin D does more than just Calcium, implicated in immunity too.
     
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  4. Strasser

    Strasser Banned

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    I wasn't addressing your posts specifically, just making a general comment on several posts whose wording seem to conflate recombination with 'mutations'.

    I don't buy the 'Out Of Africa' speculation, either; too much evidence coming out that contradicts it, from Spain to Russia to Canada to Australia and even Central America. I don't buy the 'common ancestor' speculation, either, nor that a tiny collection of bones from extinct species of apes that will fit on my kitchen table is 'scientific proof' humans evolved from apes, which is just ridiculous and an example of political ideologies trying to pass for 'science'. If assorted atheists, deviants, and sociopaths want to bash Xians, they should just bash Xians and stop pulling ridiculous nonsense out of their asses and trying to claim they're being 'rationalists'; they aren't.

    Best guess would be it wasn't a recessive trait, but dominant all along.

    The assorted speculative guesses required to make evolution make sense pretty much excludes all these different groups having a common origin; evolution as posited now works far too slowly to have popped all these racial and tribal characteristics so quickly and over such a wide areas of the world.

    I would say that's just more evidence for the case of separate origins across the Eurasian continent.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2017
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  5. ThirdTerm

    ThirdTerm Well-Known Member

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    Cheddar Man was likely to be a close genetic relative of La Brana 1, a 7,000-year-old individual from the La Brana-Arintero site in Leon, Spain. His approximate date of death was 7,150 BCE, which is close to that of La Brana 1. La Brana 1 had dark skin and blue eyes just as Cheddar Man and it carried the very rare Y-DNA haplogroup C6-V20, a low-frequency European clade of haplogroup C. Cheddar Man was determined to have belonged to haplogroup U5 and La Brana 1 belonged to mtDNA haplogroup U5b2c1 (Olalde et al. 2014).

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    Just like La Brana 1, Cheddar Man may also have carried Y-DNA haplogroup C6, which explains his darker skin pigmentation compared to modern Europeans. Haplogroup C is a known Asiatic haplogroup and the first Briton may have been genetically half Asian. Haplogroup C reaches its highest frequencies among the indigenous populations of Mongolia, the Russian Far East, Polynesia, and Australia. Cheddar Man's paternal genetic heritage, haplogroup C6-V20, is also called haplogroup C1a2 (V20). C1a is extremely rare worldwide but it has been found mainly among individuals native to Japan (0.3%) or Europe (0.5%) and among Upper Paleolithic Europeans (i.e. La Braña 1).

     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2018
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  6. The Rhetoric of Life

    The Rhetoric of Life Well-Known Member

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    So this isn't R1 or R2 that I'm looking at, but, something else? Something not R1 or R2 ?
     

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