Pentagon deploys low-yield nuclear weapon for first time: report

Discussion in 'Security & Defenses' started by Mrlucky, Feb 5, 2020.

  1. Mrlucky

    Mrlucky Well-Known Member Donor

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    This is what I'm talking about!

    We may need this sub based nuke as a deterrent to Russia but it is also perfect for first strike capability in NK and hope never needed in Iran. It's bigger than the tactical W54 (10 or 20 ton yield) at about one-third the power of the atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima in 1945. Maybe 5-6 Kilo-tons? It's explosive output is classified.

    https://www.foxnews.com/us/pentagon-deploys-low-yield-nuclear-weapin-for-first-time
     
    Last edited: Feb 5, 2020
  2. Junkieturtle

    Junkieturtle Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    It does not seem to provide a battlefield advantage. It's only point of interest is that it is low yield. I think the distinction will be lost immediately if one of these weapons, no matter what it's yield, is ever used. Granted, the missile might have other capabilities outside of blast yield that are classified, and make this missile a logical choice. I don't think yield alone makes a difference though, as far as being a deterrent. Once a country attacks another with a nuke, that's it. We're not going to be less mad if Russia uses one because it was low yield.

    That's like if I came to your house and shot you and then told you to calm down, it was just a .22. You're still going to grab your gun, whatever it is, and shoot me back.
     
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  3. Mrlucky

    Mrlucky Well-Known Member Donor

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    It is supposed to keep the playing field even in Europe since Russia is or already has developed a low yield nuke of a similar size. It would not be a weapon any country would want to have to use. The long term radiation effects would be far worse than the initial blast. It would render a city useless for many years.

    Where I could see it being effective is along the NK boarder where they have a lot of rocket assisted artillery aimed a SK. We would need to take out a lot of long range artillery very fast. It wouldn't be pretty but using tactical nukes there has often been considered over the years.

    Your analogy about shooting someone with "just a .22" made me chuckle. I was visiting Tucson several years ago. I was watching the news in a hotel room. There had been a shooting between some guy and a county sheriff. They were interviewing the sheriff who had been shot. I remember him remarking to the interviewer something like, "Oh, I'm fine. He only had a little .22. He didn't hut me much at all."
     
  4. Mushroom

    Mushroom Well-Known Member

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    Actually, one of the things that bothered me about 20 years ago was when the Crusader was cancelled.

    A new self-propelled 155mm howitzer, it had a lot of advanced features that could have handled that. Among them was the capability to tie in with RADAR and other fire direction systems to accurately return counter-battery fire within minutes. And at 10-12 rounds per minute, it could have 3 rounds in the air before the first one landed.

    So instead we still use the M109 Paladin, a gun first brought into service in the Kennedy Administration.

    Although to be entirely fair, the modern M109A6 is much more recent, being introduced in the Bush Administration. The first President Bush, in 1991. Yet another example of a military system where the equipment is older than most of those who work on it.
     

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