Processor Temps and Case Fans

Discussion in 'Computers & Tech' started by Injeun, Mar 9, 2020.

  1. Injeun

    Injeun Well-Known Member

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    While playing a fairly heavy game the other night, I noticed my processor temp was at 50-55c. My processor is rated to overheat at 70c. My question is, would adding a chassis/case fan help with this, or should I be looking at a better processor heatsink fan? If adding a chassis/case fan, should it be an intake or exhaust. Any ideas? All input welcome. Btw, I have one 120mm intake fan in the front, and one 120mm exhaust fan in the back. And of course the power supply and video card have their own exhaust fans. The case is fairly large, about 19"x8"x19".
     
  2. Mushroom

    Mushroom Well-Known Member

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    One thing is that I always suggest people to add as many case fans as their case supports.

    Whenever I look for a new case, cooling is a major consideration. My current rig has 8 of them. 2 in the front (both run over the top of the hard drives), 2 in the rear, 1 on top (vented out) and 1 on the side (vented in). Also make sure your case is always at least 2 feet above the ground, and is open on all sides. I never suggest either putting them on the ground, or in putting them in the cabinet that some desks love putting in. I have long called those "computer killers" because of the overheating problems they all cause.

    Also make sure at least 2 times a year or so you give the inside a good dusting with compressed air. Paying particular attention to the CPU and video card fans, power supply, as well as all case fans. Dust is an amazing insulator, and can add drastically to the temperature inside of a unit.
     
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  3. Durandal

    Durandal Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Good airflow is important, and typically cases direct airflow from font to back, with one or more intake fans at the front and an exhaust fan at the rear. As far as the heat sink goes, the fan on it is probably fine. If you're using a factory heat sink, especially one from Intel, however, the whole thing may be a little anaemic. Their factory heat sinks are famously inadequate. However, you can take compressed air to it and make sure it's not caked in dust, which will help thermal performance. You may also consider popping the heat sink off, cleaning off the thermal compound from the CPU and heat sink, and applying a fresh dab (about a pea-sized blob for typical consumer CPUs) of the stuff, which can be purchased very affordably (sorry if you know about this; I don't know your level of expertise in working with PC internals).

    Bottom line, however, is that yes, case fans can help keep CPU temps down since your CPU temp is determined in part by ambient temperature, and keeping air moving through your case will keep the internal ambient temperature lower.
     
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  4. Durandal

    Durandal Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    That sounds like overkill to me, but then I'm only running a Ryzen 3600 at stock settings. I have one front and one rear case fan, and they do the job. This way it also doesn't make a bunch of noise.
     

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