This doctor says that nicotine works better than ivermectin

Discussion in 'Viral/Biological' started by Scott, Nov 15, 2023.

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  1. Scott

    Scott Well-Known Member

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    The ANTIDOTE
    https://unifyd.tv/programs/the-antidote

    In the video Doctor Bryan Ardis explains why he thinks nicotine works better than ivermectin to make covid symptoms disappear. He also says that's the reason why some governments are starting crash programs to reduce smoking; it's disrupting their plan to reduce the population of the world. He says that when non-smokers with long-term covid symptoms use nicotine patches, their symptoms disappear; he recommends nicotine patches–not tobacco.

    A while back he said that covid was really snake venom. In the video he goes into detail on how he arrived at that theory.

    I'm not saying I believe all this. I'm just putting it on the table so it can be discussed. I'm just a layman so I really can't opine. I hope some medical professionals comment on this.
     
  2. Chrizton

    Chrizton Well-Known Member

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    I am not a medical professional but the data has shown in a lot of places (or did in the first year or two of COVID) that smokers were less likely to be hospitalized with COVID. The theory was that nicotine temporary turns off the receptor in lung tissues that covid spike protein was using to latch onto.
     
  3. Scott

    Scott Well-Known Member

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    At the 1:21:40 time mark of the video he says that it was discovered that nicotine was not addictive and a drug called pyrazine was added to tobacco to make it addictive. Here's the article mentioned in the video,

    A study of pyrazines in cigarettes and how additives might be used to enhance tobacco addiction
    https://tobaccocontrol.bmj.com/content/25/4/444

    Were they putting additives in tobacco to cause addiction in the 1800's? I tend to think that at that time cigars had only pure tobacco but that's only speculation. I remember reading about Sigmund Freud's tobacco addiction back in the 1800's and early 1900's.

    https://oralcancerfoundation.org/people/famous-historical/
    (excerpt)
    -------------------------------------------------------------
    Tobacco use is linked to the powerful addictive effect that nicotine can have on the body, causing oral, lung and throat cancers while making it very difficult for a person to stop using tobacco in whatever form. Knowing this addictive effect can have both physical and psychological elements, it is perhaps ironic that one of the most famous oral cancer sufferers of all was the father of modern psychoanalysis.

    Sigmund Freud was born May 6, 1856, in Moravia. When he was very young, the family moved to Vienna, where he lived most of his life. In many ways he is considered to be the most important historical figure in the areas of psychology and psychiatry, and his theories on the subconscious are debated in these fields to this day. However, he suffered from a powerful mental and physical addiction to nicotine, which would ultimately lead to heart problems and a series of oral cancers that would end his life.
    -------------------------------------------------------------

    I'd like to see Dr. Ardis address this.
     
  4. FatBack

    FatBack Well-Known Member

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    I have read from multiple different sources throughout the pandemic that smokers fared better than non-smokers.

    I guess it's maybe because our lungs are already full of goop it's hard for covid to get down in there.
     
  5. Betamax101

    Betamax101 Well-Known Member

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    Ludicrous. At very best (and certainly not solid research) it can be a mild inhibiting mechanism on certain pathways.
    The role of nicotine in COVID-19 infection - The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine (cebm.net)

    "It is extremely difficult to synthesise evidence on nicotine and COVID-19 as much of the literature is inconsistent. Below we highlight pathways/hypothetical mechanisms through which at least one paper has speculated nicotine might impact SARS-Cov-2:
    Ok, this "doctor" is a "retired Chiropractor, Certified Acupuncturist and Nutritionist."
    1. Do you seriously attribute expertise to him that is sufficient to give a credible opinion?
    2. Why haven't you summarized what he thinks?
    And there we have it - total batshit.
    Uhuh, more batshit!
    Instead of just dumping a video, why haven't you detailed how this chiropractor "arrived" at his batshit "theory"!?
    Why not follow the scientific method? Go out and find things to prove/disprove it!

    Does Nicotine Kill the COVID-19 Virus? (healthline.com)
    "Researchers monitored 622 people with active COVID-19 enrolled in the study, filtering the groups into smokers versus nonsmokers.

    People in the smoking group were more likely to experience complications such as cerebrovascular disease, heightened white blood cell counts, and elevated hemoglobin and creatinine levels. Additionally, smokers had worse survival outcomes than nonsmokers.

    While some studies do suggest that smokers have a lower incidence of COVID-19, some of these have been debunked for a few reasons. First, studies performed in the early days of COVID-19 were often rushed to publication, not allowing for the traditional review and vetting process typically required before results were printed.

    Some experts also believe that smoking incidence is often under-reported by people who want to avoid being lectured for having a known unhealthy habit.

    Other research suggests that smoking can actually increase your chances of contracting SARS-CoV-2. A recent study found that smoking often increased the lung gene expression of ACE2, the specific receptor for SARS-CoV-2. In other words, smoking made it easier for SARS-CoV-2 to infect tobacco users.

    Overall, few reputable health officials formally support tobacco or nicotine use as a preventive aid to avoid contracting SARS-CoV-2 or experiencing more severe symptoms. This is especially true given the long-term and proven effects tobacco use can have on a person’s overall health."
     
  6. modernpaladin

    modernpaladin Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Nicotene is one of many poisons that, in the right concentration, can kill bad things in the human body without harming the body itself. So its not unreasonable to look at it as an option. It is also a carcinogen. But there is mounting evidence that cancer is most commonly an issue of cumulative exposure, and therapeutic exposure to carcinogens can be done without much increasing the risk of cancer. There are in fact many common products we use all the time that are carcinogens. In CA it is commonly said that 'everything causes cancer.' Just about anything you can buy there has a cancer warning label, to the extent that pretty much no one pays any attention to them anymore.
     

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