How a Glock works

Discussion in 'Gun Control' started by Robert, Jan 13, 2021.

  1. Monash

    Monash Well-Known Member

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    So basically you despise them because their not American based? Geography and history ends up putting a manufacturer of firearms in Austria and that makes their products crap?

    For a start for all the fame its pistols receive Glock is a niche firearm manufacturer. It produces pistols and only pistols, no long arms of any type. In fact from memory apart from its range of pistols it only manufactures knives and tools. So why would a company in that situation want to establish large scale production operations in the US when it doesn't have the manufacturing capacity and product range to complete with all the other local manufacturers. If setting up large scale manufacturing in the US had made any economic sense the company would have done so. The fact it hasn't indicates such a move might bankrupt it.

    Finally lots of car companies have assembly plants in the US, Porsche doesn't. Are they a bad company, are their products crap?
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2021
  2. Well Bonded

    Well Bonded Well-Known Member Donor

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    I had a friend of mine who's not a dummy, he inherited a Colt 1911 and loved it, it developed a problem, sometimes after the slide was dropped it would not go into battery, now I am quite sure you understand the factory 1911 by design has slack in the slide and rails, you push the slide release the slide slams shut in a very authoritative manner.

    He brought the unloaded gun over to my place with a round still in the chamber, he didn't understand that needed to be removed, I cleared the gun dropped the slide and it slithered forward and required a nudge on the back of the slide to go into battery, he pointed out that was the same problem he was having.

    I asked when was the last time he cleaned this gun, the answer was every time I get back from the range, I unload it, take it out to the garage where my wife and children cannot see it and give a good and complete spraying down with WD-40, wipe it down and put it back in the box and hide it in the closet.

    Pushing a little further I asked when was the last time you tore it down and really cleaned it, he asked what is tearing it down mean, I explained that means disassembly of the gun, he exclaimed I would never do that, I might break it or something.

    So he left it with me.

    Tearing it down I discovered it was swamped with what seemed to be cooking grease, in reality it was evaporated WD-40 combined with carbon, lint and just a touch of rust.

    Everything excepting the stocks where placed in a ultrasonic washer and left to run overnight, the next day my cleaning solution was totally black, but the parts where darn clean, it was reassembled and on the range it worked flawlessly, none the less I ordered a new slide spring from Numrich, the old one would not roll flat on my desk and I don't like that.

    I had him stop by and tried to explain with a couple of diagrams how to tear it down and clean it, he refused to even give that a try, he wanted to just bring it by after he used it and have me clean it for him for fee, not a problem, I can handle that.

    Moral of the story, there are people out there who have no idea of what cleaning a firearm really means and some have probably had things go flying the first time they tried, so they take it home and hose it down with WD-40, which is nasty stuff once it flash's off and consider it to be clean.
     
    Last edited: Jan 23, 2021
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  3. 557

    557 Well-Known Member

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    Ever had one ship to you from another FFL with a round chambered?

    I’ve heard such stories from others I’ve known who worked counters as well. Every once in a while you see a very experienced shooter admit to a negligent discharge after they have “looked” in the chamber. The habit of “looking” and assuming they will always see an empty chamber is just an autopilot reflex and they miss seeing there is a round in the chamber. Bang.

    You’re right, you can’t be too careful.
     
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  4. Seth Bullock

    Seth Bullock Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    You're absolutely right about so-called "looking" in the chamber. I see people go through the motions all the time without really looking. In my classes I tell them to "inspect" the chamber, and I require them to feel inside the chamber with a finger. They must do both. If I see someone take a "flash" look at the chamber, I make them do it again.
     
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  5. 557

    557 Well-Known Member

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    I’ll be honest, I don’t always feel the chamber. I do at night or if I know I’m likely suffering from sleep deprivation.

    Prescription drugs, stress, alcohol, and sleep deprivation all affect our competence even when we have the best of intentions. I don’t drink, but there are a few months of the year I get little sleep. Sometimes I just completely abstain from handling firearms until I’m better rested.
     
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  6. Seth Bullock

    Seth Bullock Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I'm a big believer in overlapping safety procedures, and that is one of them. Feeling the chamber, even if you can see that its empty, slows down the process of clearing the pistol by a few critical seconds, and we can all spare 3 seconds to be sure we're right.

    One of the things I remember someone once saying is that "a bullet has no conscience." And once it's headed down the barrel, it doesn't care who it hurts, who it kills, and it doesn't care about your guilt or remorse. It doesn't care about your children, your wife, or your friends. And if it drives through your heart, or your friends heart, or your baby's heart, the bullet doesn't care, and there is no do-over, no fixing it.

    I've always remembered those words. And so I check magazine well and chamber, visually and physically, every time, and I insist upon it with my students.
     
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  7. An Taibhse

    An Taibhse Well-Known Member

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    Several parts of your narrative resonate with my experience.
    I have done a lot of work on 1911s brought to me to figure I’d issues. More than half are related to the owner. The original design was balanced for a specific ammo and loose tolerances and was very reliable even with the range of care it might be given by citizen soldiers, but not so the later versions which which later seeming minor mods to the basic design, (tightened tolerance, ramp changes, different part steels, shortened slides, adding firing pin block, etc.) have made the gun more of a challenge for EDC reliability advocates. But, some manufacturers hade done a good job with the more modern versions, but they are platforms requiring a fairly high level attention to a good maintenance regimen than early models. Your description of the gun’s condition you observed after breaking it down is not uncommon with among 1911 owners, nor among gun owners in general.
    I am often asked to advise with someone buying a first gun. Many expect a off the top of my head answer. They are surprised at many of my questions, including sometimes asking I can look over their car, something I do to guagu
    Never happened to me that an FFL has given me a gun to work on with a round in the chamber. But, at the same time I trust no one, including myself... after all guns are alive, don’t you know, and sneaky, they can load themselves the moment your attention is diverted....Lol.
    The one exception was a time, several years ago, a fellow had brought in a civil war issued ‘53 pattern Enfield that had been used as a wall hanger by his Grand Da for known memory before he died. It wasn’t capped, but when I checked it, it was loaded... so who knows how long it was hanging in that condition and handled by the curious? Btw, when I unloaded it, it turned it had been double loaded, leading me to suspect that the double load occurred under stress, likely on a battlefield.
     
    Last edited: Jan 24, 2021
  8. joesnagg

    joesnagg Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, WD-40 has it's uses, but on firearms one may as well use Aunt Jemima. I've been a fan of Break Free since it came out, but only for the final lubricating, the scrubbin' is done with good old Hoppes No.9. Everybody's got their pet ways, that's mine.
     
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  9. Enuf Istoomuch

    Enuf Istoomuch Well-Known Member

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    So, in a nutshell, you completely ignored what I said and made up something else to complain about. Good for you.
     
  10. Well Bonded

    Well Bonded Well-Known Member Donor

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    I have seen people pull a slide back, let it go and drop the mag, then since a round was expelled, considered the gun to be unloaded.

    And I know for a fact I did that as a teen, when I pulled the trigger on a old .22 rifle I found in the trash and ruined a very nice kitchen table.

    Now I was raised around firearms and had been shooting them since I was 8 or so, but I never owned a semi-auto until I was 12 and I just didn't train properly or understand that system, I realized what I did was totally my fault and I sure as He** never did something that stupid again.

    Luckily for me I had enough training to understand to keep the bang end of a gun pointed in a safe direction, so all I did was property damage and later all my dad was some belt to the butt damage, but that AD sunk in and will never be forgotten, once was enough and such has never happened again.
     
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  11. Well Bonded

    Well Bonded Well-Known Member Donor

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    Break free I think is a Freon based solvent, it works but is costly, Hoppes #9 stinks to high heaven but it works real well and is low priced, I use it in a ultrasonic cleaner, put everything excepting stocks in the pan and let it run overnight, even though it's gets black and nasty looking it still keeps on cleaning.

    Of course the US cleaner is useless for long guns, but Hoppes #9 is still what I use to clean them, put on some old Goodwill two dollar clothes and go out in the shop and clean away, if I was to use it in the house, because of the lingering smell, I couldn't put up with it and my wife would agree, which is something I do not need to happen.

    As for lubrication, a number of decades back, my wife and I had a wonderful privileged of taking a tour through Colt's manufacturing facility, while there I noticed they where using a product called Boeshield T-9, it is a lubricant and corrosive and rust prevented product, unlike WD-40, when it evaporates it leaves behind a decent amount of lubrication.

    However it is really designed for long term storage of firearms, but there is a secondary product known as Boelube, it works very well and like a lot of lubricants it does not migrate from here it was applied.

    So my routine is thoroughly clean the firearm, using the micro-tip of the Boelube lubricate the parts that need to be lubricated then give the firearm a overall spray of Boeshield to prevent rusting or corrosion.

    https://boeshield.com/

    https://orelube.com/about-boelube-products/boelube-liquids/
     
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  12. Monash

    Monash Well-Known Member

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    Sorry, it must have been someone else who wrote:

    'But Glock is a bad company in my eyes. When I look at how they achieved their market impact and how that tiny operation of their's on American shores was built and is supplied to this day, I do not see a company to admire. Glock demeans American manufacturing, American design, American workers and even American raw materials and tools.'

    That being the point I was addressing in my post.

    As for the rest? You don't like the safety systems Glock has designed into its pistols. Fine. Some people do, some people don't. I had no comment.
     
  13. joesnagg

    joesnagg Well-Known Member

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    Maybe, I've never used spray lubricants, I apply bottled Break Free with cloths, small brushes, and Q-tips. Being Mr. El Cheapo I can't abide the wasted product, LOL.
     
  14. Robert

    Robert Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I found a shooters review of the Ruger Blackhawk single action

     
  15. Robert

    Robert Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I appreciate discussions like this and copied the names cited above in my cell phone. I need to buy some good gun cleaner.

    Apparently Boelube is a creation of Boeing Aircraft.
     
  16. Well Bonded

    Well Bonded Well-Known Member Donor

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    Your welcome, glad to help anyone out if I can.

    That is correct, both Boeshield and Boelube where invented by Boeing, not sure what they do with Boelube, but they use Boeshield as a protective coating for aircraft parts before they are placed into storage.

    However I do know for a fact a tiny little drop of Boelube on the moving parts of a semi-auto are all that is needed for lubrication between cleanings and unlike WD-40, neither of them migrate eliminating the possibility of contaminating a primer of a round in the chamber, where the bolt is against the rear of it.

    Now on commercial ammo the primers are sealed after being seated, but it is rumored WD-40 can penetrate through some of those sealants, maybe true maybe not, I don't want to find out the hard way, so I don't use WD-40 on firearms.
     
  17. Well Bonded

    Well Bonded Well-Known Member Donor

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    By the way these are the products under discussion.

    [​IMG]

    You can see while they are the same color the T-9 has a much lower viscosity and wets the paper a lot quicker than the Boelube does.

    Neither is all that inexpensive but when compared to the cost of a modern firearm and how well they work, they are both reasonably priced.
     
  18. Doofenshmirtz

    Doofenshmirtz Well-Known Member Donor

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    My Glocks suck at killing people. They don't even move unless I pick one up and fire it. I have to load the, clean them, and put them to bed. Some people are very good at killing people. Being armed makes it more difficult for them.

    I can't figure that out either. Even if they make the mistake of assuming its unloaded, why would they aim it at themselves when pulling the trigger?
     
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  19. JET3534

    JET3534 Well-Known Member

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    G26 9mm. Accurate (for size) and 100% reliable. The downside, it is too thick, but the G-43 was not available when I purchased the 26.
     
  20. mentor59

    mentor59 Well-Known Member

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    Well of course it is, that is why it is made for God's sake.
     
  21. modernpaladin

    modernpaladin Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    Not any better than a knife or a stick unless it has a human directing it.
     
  22. JET3534

    JET3534 Well-Known Member

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    What was the make/model of the gun that went off during appendix carry? Was the gun carried in a proper holster? Had it been modified in any way?
     
  23. JET3534

    JET3534 Well-Known Member

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    I want to maintain my 9mm ammo inventory. And handgun shooting is a skill that requires constant practice, e.g., with flash sight picture and trigger control. Therefore I recently bought a Beretta licensed Umarex BB pistol. Same weight, trigger, size, sights, etc. as a Beretta 92. No accuracy of any kind, but something to practice with in the back yard.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2021
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  24. joesnagg

    joesnagg Well-Known Member

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    If memory serves me ( and this was 40 yrs. ago) it was a 25ACP, make and model I don't recall, carried in a no-name clip-on nylon holster. Now he swore to one and all the safety was properly engaged. Not being present I had to take him at his word. Of course one might plausibly argue that someone who shot off a gonad might not be inclined to place the blame on themselves ;)
     
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  25. Turtledude

    Turtledude Well-Known Member Past Donor

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    I own at least a dozen and have won four of them. I won't carry one for the reason you stated. I carry a SW Shield or a SIG 365 XL-both with manual safeties
     
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